Framing an image

Read, Look, Know, Apply

http://www.mediacollege.com/video/camera/tutorial/01-planning.html  Plan

http://accad.osu.edu/womenandtech/Storyboard%20Resource/   Storyboard

http://www.mediacollege.com/video/camera/tutorial/01-framing.html  Headroom

http://www.jou.ufl.edu/faculty/mmcadams/video/five_shot.html  10 sec Rule

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4316BUEVYkE  takes 4 mins

http://www.the-flying-animator.com/storyboard-template.html

 

Proper framing

The first thing to learn is how to frame your subject.  If you’re a still photographer you’ll already know about the rule of thirds.  This works for filmmaking as well.  Notice the website below.

The rule of thirds:
This is a general principle in photography, which is generally considered to make shots more appealing to the eye.  One can easily visualize this rule by taking a frame and dividing the horizontal piece into three equal sections and dividing the vertical in three equal sections.  This creates 9 equal sections.  Where these sections meet are four points on the frame.  By aligning the central object into these points of the frame (often called the power points), instead of centering the object, you get more aesthetically and professional-looking shots.

However, we should note that while we describe this as the RULE of thirds, it might better be used as a guideline.

Common uses of this rule in video are:

  • Framing an interview: The eyes of your subject should fall in one of the upper powerpoints and the subject should be looking towards the empty space on the frame.
  • Shooting a horizon: Rather than position the horizon on the center of the frame, align it along the upper or lower third depending on what you want to emphasize.  For example, if you’re shooting a cloud time-lapse you will want two-thirds of the shot centered on the sky.